Monday, 12 June 2017

Mutinta from Zambia: Everyday A Girl #EDAG

By Mutinta Muchanga



THE SKY IS THE LIMIT FOR MUTINTA: A LIFE OF MANY POSSIBILITIES

This is the story of Mutinta Muchanga for #EverydayAGirl, as shared via UN Online Volunteers.



Mutinta is 29 years old. She is prone to weight gain and keeps  fit  by taking a morning walk as part of her exercise routine. She does this at 5 am every week day.



She is a student studying to be a Doctor of Dental Surgery at The Copperbelt University (CBU) Medical School in Ndola, Zambia. She is in her final year and attends to patients during clinical rotations.




She has a lunch break from 1pm to 2pm. She uses this time to work on school assignments. She also checks her emails and makes progress on  her online volunteering tasks.



After school, she gets back home to do her laundry, maintaining green habits by allowing her clothes to dry in natural sunlight.



Afterward, she relaxes while soaking up the sun and reads a magazine.





In the evening, Mutinta takes time to do some cooking. Its one of her favorite hobbies.






She also has a talent of braiding hair. Being a student, she has a limited budget and resorts to styling her own hair each day rather than spending money at the hair salon.


Mutinta likes to relax and spends time with her friends while having a great dinner at her favorite restaurant.






The story of Everyday a Girl, tagged #EDAG, is a glance into the lives of ordinary women through a series of poignant photo stories. These series of images will visually express the roles, challenges, activities and duties that females in diverse communities face in their daily lives.

SAFIGI Outreach Foundation Ltd, a volunteer-run NGO registered in Zambia, implemented EDAG in order to place a strong emphasis on positively redefining the role of females in our society. This campaign highlights that gender equality and equity, woman empowerment, and safety for the girls is key to the world’s socio-economic development.

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Romania's Superwoman: Everyday A Girl #EDAG

By Melissa Elle




This is the story of Nuta for #EverydayAGirl, as shared by Melissa Elle via UN Online Volunteers.




Nuta is a 37 years old Romanian woman, mother of 2 children and my aunt. The first thing she must do after she wakes up is to dress up. This is before her morning routine.

 


Once she’s ready she has to prepare the chicken feed.





She enjoys watching how the little birds eat all that she has prepared. 





The next step on a summer day is digging. She has to dig the carrots in the garden and evaluate their growth day by day.




When she finishes with the garden she comes inside and makes the fire for cooking.




On the day this picture was taken, Nuța baked some potatoes which we served with cheese.



After feeding the family, she must help her father-in-law (my grandfather) with the beekeeping activities. 




When evening is close, Nuța must milk the cow .



After she "has a talk" with the cow, she comes inside to boil the milk.




At the end of the day, before it gets dark, Nuța loves to crochet something because it relaxes her. In this way she is ready for the next exhausting day.







The story of Everyday a Girl, tagged #EDAG, is a glance into the lives of ordinary women through a series of poignant photo stories. These series of images will visually express the roles, challenges, activities and duties that females in diverse communities face in their daily lives.

SAFIGI Outreach Foundation Ltd, a volunteer-run NGO registered in Zambia, implemented EDAG in order to place a strong emphasis on positively redefining the role of females in our society. This campaign highlights that gender equality and equity, woman empowerment, and safety for the girls is key to the world’s socio-economic development.

Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Rekha from India: Everyday A Girl #EDAG

By Manjima Misra





This is the story of Rekha Biswas for #EverydayAGirl, as shared by Manjima Misra via UN Online Volunteers.






This is Rekha Biswas, aged 48, who lives in Shantiniketan, West Bengal, India.






She is a handloom weaver who makes couches out of jute and bamboo. It is almost like a mini cottage industry, which is the main source of her income and she devotes maximum of her time to this work.





After her weaving work in the daytime is completed, she goes to fetch water and has to go through the daily hassles and fights to collect water as there is not sufficient availability of groundwater through pumping.




She works as a domestic servant to supplement her income in the evening. Her works involves washing utensils and sweeping the floor.




At the end of the day, she cooks for the family and finishes off with her household chores. 









The story of Everyday a Girl, tagged #EDAG, is a glance into the lives of ordinary women through a series of poignant photo stories. These series of images will visually express the roles, challenges, activities and duties that females in diverse communities face in their daily lives.

SAFIGI Outreach Foundation Ltd, a volunteer-run NGO registered in Zambia, implemented EDAG in order to place a strong emphasis on positively redefining the role of females in our society. This campaign highlights that gender equality and equity, woman empowerment, and safety for the girls is key to the world’s socio-economic development.

Sunday, 30 April 2017

Anastasia from Romania: Everyday A Girl #EDAG

By Moraru Anastasia 




This is the story of Moraru Anastasia for #EverydayAGirl, as shared via UN Online Volunteers.






Being a girl can be harder than it seems, as from time to time, doors may be suddenly closed in front of you. You are expected to do the impossible and when you try to prove you can, you are told it's still not good enough. You can hardly oppose to what you've been conditioned to do. Can you use force? Is there any point in talking to walls?


I've never been the girl waiting for them to fall. I'm Anastasia and I break them down myself. 




I believe that the access to education is the only way to break walls down and to earn yourself a voice. Thus I make time for reading. My backpack is always full of books to share and recommend to everybody.





Even so, no matter how much we desire to be educated, school isn't always the place to speak your mind or, in any case, be yourself. Rare are the occasions when girls are allowed to wear what they want, when they aren't the victims of female malice and male mocking, when they aren't judged on how they look, speak, think. Envy, stereotypes and bad manners are deep rooted in our society.






Once you go back to the real world, you may find the old criticism, sometimes from your parents, that you are not the daughter they dreamed of or from teen lovers, for ruining your expectations. When you are a girl who has grown up reading and not playing so much, it will take a time to start relating to others. You might find yourself alone, waiting for somebody to come and talk to you. You are too shy to feel accepted. You will sit like me in this photo and wonder where did it all go wrong. It didn't. It's just part of growing up. People are changing and you change with them. It's okay to be quiet, as long as you realise the only way to be happy is to be contented with solitude from time to time. 




I believe in God and I pray whenever I feel very alone or very happy. Therefore, going to church is an important part of my life. However, the role of women in church has been long debated. Being raised as a Christian, I have my own doubts about getting involved in the debate. Not only tradition is important, but also making it adjust to the world we live in. You have to be moderate or it won't work the right way. However, I believe that I was born in this religion for a purpose and it was not just a circumstance. Maybe it could help me find a meaning.






Now I am getting ready to pack. For a person who wants a great future, this is a place where nobody should ever return if not convinced to make a change. The corrupted politics brought the town into bankruptcy and education is estimated to be at some of the lowest points in our country. No more jobs and there has been announced there will be no more heat next winter. How can anybody leave a town like this? There is no surprise that the most of us are going away. 





This is me as everybody can see me. Optimistic and cheerful, enjoying the best parts of my life. All in all, I am a 17 year old girl with big dreams in a small town on the banks of the Danube River, Romania. And I haven't lost my hope yet.

I might not know what I'll be doing in the following years, but it doesn't scare me. I am ready to try something new as ever since I was a child I moved with my parents in different cities for new beginnings. This might be my future life too. Always striving for more. That's why my motto is now 'Never Ever Settle'.

Anyway, I believe that I can write my own personal future and that I am capable of making a move in the right direction both for myself and the places I'll be going.






The story of Everyday a Girl, tagged #EDAG, is a glance into the lives of ordinary women through a series of poignant photo stories. These series of images will visually express the roles, challenges, activities and duties that females in diverse communities face in their daily lives.

SAFIGI Outreach Foundation Ltd, a volunteer-run NGO registered in Zambia, implemented EDAG in order to place a strong emphasis on positively redefining the role of females in our society. This campaign highlights that gender equality and equity, woman empowerment, and safety for the girls is key to the world’s socio-economic development.

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Zhao from China: Everyday A Girl #EDAG

By Yuhan Zou Amanda




This is the story of Zhao Danni for #EverydayAGirl, as shared by Yuhan Zou Amanda via UN Online Volunteers.





Zhao Danni is a 22-year-old Chinese girl. She study at Liverpool University and came back to hometown Chongqing to spend her summer vacation.





She found an internship in a business company which is located in the center of Chongqing. 




To avoid being late, she have to get up at 6:30am to catch the subway. After that, she will sit down on the same chair in the office room for more than 7 hours.




 After work, she will spend 30 minutes during the rush hours in the subway. 




Sometimes, if the tasks are really tough she has to take them back home to finish. While the others are eating hotpot, she is still listening to the online meeting. 





“Leave one piece of beef to me.” She says and continues to take some notes.







The story of Everyday a Girl, tagged #EDAG, is a glance into the lives of ordinary women through a series of poignant photo stories. These series of images will visually express the roles, challenges, activities and duties that females in diverse communities face in their daily lives.

SAFIGI Outreach Foundation Ltd, a volunteer-run NGO registered in Zambia, implemented EDAG in order to place a strong emphasis on positively redefining the role of females in our society. This campaign highlights that gender equality and equity, woman empowerment, and safety for the girls is key to the world’s socio-economic development.

Thursday, 30 March 2017

Andrea from Mexico: Everyday A Girl #EDAG

By Ijeoma Ukasoanya




This is the story of Andrea for #EverydayAGirl, as shared by Ijeoma Ukasoanya via UN Online Volunteers.


Andrea is a 27 year old Mexican,  on a short visit to Nsukka, a suburb of Enugu State, Nigeria. She is loving, cheerful and selfless. She has an unwavering passion and love for the black race.




Here, Andrea is with my brother (Ijeoma's) Harry. Harry decides to take Andrea on a tour round Nsukka.






Andrea is at the Adada River- a popular river in Nsukka, known for it's beautiful and serene nature. Andrea loves the cool nature of the river.





Andrea then goes to the fruit Market in Nsukka. Her love for children won't let her get her hands off the Vendor's baby.



The female students of Queens Secondary School- an only girls secondary school in Nsukka, can't get enough of Andrea's company.




This is me (Ijeoma) and Andrea trying to make dinner. She is exhausted after a long day's tour.






She insists on helping out in the kitchen.




I made sure we took a cute picture together after dinner had been served.










The story of Everyday a Girl, tagged #EDAG, is a glance into the lives of ordinary women through a series of poignant photo stories. These series of images will visually express the roles, challenges, activities and duties that females in diverse communities face in their daily lives.

SAFIGI Outreach Foundation Ltd, a volunteer-run NGO registered in Zambia, implemented EDAG in order to place a strong emphasis on positively redefining the role of females in our society. This campaign highlights that gender equality and equity, woman empowerment, and safety for the girls is key to the world’s socio-economic development.